Armistice Day

Today is the 11th day of the 11th month – November 11 – Armistice Day.  But many of us know it as Veterans Day here in the United States and Remembrance Day for our neighbors in Canada and across the pond in Great Britain.

“Armistice Day (which overlaps with Remembrance Day and Veterans Day) is celebrated every year on 11 November to commemorate the armistice signed between the Allies of World War I and Germany at Compiègne, France, for the cessation of hostilities on the Western Front of World War I, which took effect at eleven o’clock in the morning—the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918. While this official date to mark the end of the war reflects the ceasefire on the Western Front, hostilities continued in other regions, especially across the former Russian Empire and in parts of the old Ottoman Empire.

The date was declared a national holiday in many allied nations, to commemorate those members of the armed forces who were killed during war. An exception is Italy, where the end of the war is commemorated on 4 November, the day of the Armistice of Villa Giusti.

After World War II, the name of the holiday was changed to Veterans Day in the United States and to Remembrance Day in the countries of the British Commonwealth of Nations. Armistice Day remains an official holiday in France and Belgium. In 2012 Armistice Day became an official holiday in Serbia.” {courtesy of Wikipedia.com for more information click on the link}

Today we honor all the men and women from wars past along with the Veterans of the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, Bosnia, Serbia and the Wars on Terror in Iraq, Kuwait and Afghanistan.  The war to end all wars soon forgotten.

We also remember the Veterans of Canada and Great Britain and other nations, who selflessly gave of themselves.  I do not know much of the history of Canada and Great Britain so I would like my fellow bloggers and friends to add their stories.

“In Canada and Great Britain, the red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem “In Flanders Fields”. These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their brilliant red color an appropriate symbol for the blood spilled in the war. ” Click on the picture for more information.

These men and women who serve their nations are proud, dedicated and brave young souls, who may go to fight wars, but they also rebuild nations.  They left their families to fight in faraway places and at times in their own backyards, to protect at all costs what they hold dear. Some paid with their lives, some with physical scars and many with emotional scars that may never heal.  It is up to us to never forget and to always honor their sacrifice.

Today we remember all of them, past, present and future.  God bless you and may we never forget your bravery or for what you believe in – “Liberty, Justice, Freedom and Country. We salute you!

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About Patty B

My life centers around my faith in God and my family. www.thoughtsfromanamericanwoman.wordpress.com
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13 Responses to Armistice Day

  1. Tourism Oxford says:

    Well said. I heard of some people today who did not honor the minute of silence. I can’t think of the appropriate words for such an action.
    We cannot forget what these soldiers did for us. That includes not playing Christmas music before Nov 11th. It’s disrespectful to the veterans. They have one day – let them have it.

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  2. terry1954 says:

    very good writing! thank u for sharing with me

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  3. While I don’t know a lot of details of Canadian history…The Canadian Corps which consisted of Canadian and British soldiers captured a key area called Vimy Ridge in WW1 in three days but at a loss of almost 4000 killed and 7000 other casualties…..but all that have given their lives for the freedom we have today in all wars are honored this Remembrance Day 2012….Diane

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  4. Thank you for this beautiful post. My eyes easily well up with tears with how deep my gratitude is for all those who fought for the freedom I gratefully enjoy. God Bless you and yours. And thank you, again, for this heart-warming post. Love from, Gina

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  5. I loved reading this post. Thanks.

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  6. margaret21 says:

    So. British memories. I can’t give you much. My grandfather was dead by the time of the 2nd World War, and my mother was a young teacher. Her memories are of returning to school in the evenings to ‘firewatch’ – to give early warning of bomber planes flying over the northern city of York. Once, bombs were dropped nearby, and the school staircases long bore the scars of the damage to the buiilding which did, however, remain standing. She met my father doing voluntary work with the RAF, welcoming Polish nationals who had fled here during the war. He was one of the huge Polish community who arrived here in the early ’40’s, and he became a navigator in the Air Force. Like many Poles. he was an excellent linguist, and by the time the war was over, he was fully integrated into English society, and married my mother shortly after.

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  7. margaret21 says:

    So. British memories. I can’t give you much. My grandfather was dead by the time of the 2nd World War, and my mother was a young teacher. Her memories are of returning to school in the evenings to ‘firewatch’ – to give early warning of bomber planes flying over the northern city of York. Once, bombs were dropped nearby, and the school staircases long bore the scars of the damage to the building which did, however, remain standing. She met my father doing voluntary work with the RAF, welcoming Polish nationals who had fled here during the war. He was one of the huge Polish community who arrived here in the early ’40’s, and he became a navigator in the Air Force. Like many Poles. he was an excellent linguist, and by the time the war was over, he was fully integrated into English society, and married my mother shortly after.

    Like

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